Danu, Great Mother

Dana, Anu, Ana, Anann, Danand, Dôn (Wales), Danuvius (Roman), Duna (Hungarian), Donau (German)

  • Danu is an ancient Irish triple goddess who is considered the “Great Mother” of Ireland.
  • She is the Mother of the Irish gods and faery people, the Tuatha Dé Danann , which literally means the “People of the Goddess Danu”.
  • Danu means knowledge, wisdom, wealth and abundance.  However her name is also connected to water, and could mean ‘the flowing one’.
  • Danu is thought to have married Bilé and was the mother of the Dagda, the chief leader of the Tuatha Dé Danann.  In other myths, she is known as the daughter or lover of the Dagda.
  • Her other children included Nuada, Dian Cécht, Ogma, Airmid, Etan, Miach, Cian/Kian, Sawan and Goibhniu.
  • Because of the similarities in correspondences, Danu has been associated with other goddesses, including Anu, the Universal Mother, and the Morrigan, the goddess of war.
  • Danu is also very similar to the Welsh goddess Dôn, who is the mother figure of the medieval tales in the Mabinogion.
  • Danu was also sometimes associated with Brigid, the daughter of the Dagda.

Danu

  • It is thought through her association with water, the River Danube was named after her.
  • Also, there are two round-topped hills in County Kerry, Ireland, called Da Chich Anu/Anann (the Paps of Anu), thought to represent the two breasts of Danu/Anu.

Danu_Anu

  • Danu has a strong connection to the land and water.  She is a goddess of fertility, bounty, plenty, prosperity, wind, rivers, water, wells, wisdom, and inspiration.
  • Some of Danu’s symbols include holy stones, horses, seagulls, fish, amber, gold, flowing water, air, wind, earth, moon, keys and crowns.
  • Danu reminds us that we are capable of realizing our own dreams, empowering us to create our own destiny.

Wiki Danu
Goddess Danu
Timeless Myths – Danu
Celtic Deities
Thalia Took – Danu

© The Celtic Journey (2013)

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